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Priestley's Complete Works
 
     
 

The following are the complete works of Joseph Priestley as listed in the first volume of John Towill Rutt's The Theological and Miscellaneous Works of Joseph Priestley.  Rutt often used a different edition then the ones listed below.  Below are the dates when the manuscript was first published.


1761

  • The Scripture Doctrine of Remission, which shews that the Death of Christ is no proper Sacrifice, nor Satisfaction for Sin; but that Pardon is dispensed solely on the account of Repentance, or a Personal Reformation of the Sinner.

  • The Rudiments of English Grammar, to which are added, Observations on Style and Specimens of English Composition, adapted to the use of Schools.


1762

  • A Course of Lectures on the Theory of Language and Universal Grammar.  Printed for the use of the Students at Warrington.


1764

  • On the Duty of not Living to Ourselves.  A Sermon, preached before the Assembly of Ministers of the Counties o Lancaster and Chester, met at Manchester, May 16, 1764, to Carry into execution a Scheme for the Relief of their Widows and Children.


1765

  • An Essay on the Course of Liberal Education for Civil and Active Life, with Plans of Lectures on the Study of History and General Policy, on the History of England, and on the Constitution and Laws of England.

  • A Chart of Biography, with a book containing an Explanation of it, and all the Names inserted in it.


1767

  • The History and Present State of Electricity, with Original Experiments.


1768

  • A Familiar Introduction to the Study of Electricity, with Original Experiments.

  • An Essay on the First Principles of Government, and on the Nature of Political, Civil, and Religious Liberty.

  • The English Grammar, with Notes and Observations, for the Use of those who have made some Proficiency in the Language.

  • A Free Address to Protestant Dissenters on the subject of the Lord's Supper.


1769

  • Considerations on Church Authority, occasioned by Dr. Balguy's Sermon on that subject, preached at Lambeth Chapel, and published by order of the Archbishop.

  • Considerations on Differences of Opinion among Christians, with a Letter to the Rev. Mr. Venn, in answer to his Full and Free Examination of the Address to the Protestant Dissenters on the subject of the Lord's Supper.

  • A Free Address to Protestant Dissenters, as such, by a Dissenter.

  • A Serous Address to Masters of Families, with Forms of Family Prayer.

  • A New Chart of History, with a book explaining it, containing a View of the Principal Revolutions of Empires that have taken place in the World.

  • Remarks on some Paragraphs in the fourth volume of Dr. Blackstone's Commentaries on the Laws of England, relating to Dissenters.

  • An Answer (in the St. Jame's Chronicle) to Dr. Blacksonte's Reply.

  • A View of the Principles and Conduct of Protestant Dissenters, with respect to the Civil and Ecclesiastical Constitution on England.

  • The Present State of Liberty in Great Britain and her Colonies.  By an Englishman.

  • The Theological Repository; consisting of Original Essays, Hints, Queries, &c. Calculated to promote Religious Knowledge.  Published under the direction of Dr. Priestley.


1770

  • A Familiar Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Perspective.

  • A Free Address to Protestant Dissenters on the subject of Church Discipline.  With a Preliminary Discourse concerning the Spirit of Christianity, and the Corruption of it, by false Notions of Religion.

  • A Letter to the Author of the Protestant Dissenter's Answer to the Free Address on the subject of the Lord's Supper. 

  • Letters to the Author of "Remarks on several late Publications relative to the Dissenters, in a Letter to Dr. Priestley."

  • Additional Letter on "Remarks".

  • An Appeal to the Serous and Candid Professors of Christianity on the following subjects, viz 1. The Use of Reason in Matters of Religion. 2. The Power of Man to do the Will of God. 3. Original Sin. 4. Election and Reprobation. 5. The Divinity of Christ. And, 6. Atonement for Sin by the Death of Christ.  To which   are added, A Concise history of those Doctrines, and the Triumph of Truth, being an Account of the Tiral of Mr. Elwall for Heresy and Blasphemy.

  • A Familiar Illustration of Certain Passages of Scripture.


1771

  • Letters and Queries, addressed to the anonymous Answerer of an Appeal, to the Serious and Candid Professors of Christianity, to the Rev. Mr. Thomas Morgan, and to Mr. Cornelius Caley.

  • The Theological Repository. Vols. II,, III


1772

  • Directions for Impregnating Water with Fixed Air.

  • The History of the Present State of Discoveries relating to Vision, Light, Colours.

  • Institutes of Natural and Revealed Religion Vol. I To Which is prefixed, An Essay on the best Method of communicating Religious Knowledge to Christian Societies.


1773

  • An Address to Protestant Dissenters on the subject of giving the Lord's Supper to Children.

  • A Sermon, preached before the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters at Mill-Hill Chapel, Leeds, May 16, 1773, an occasion of resigning the Pastoral Office amongst them.

  • Institutes of Natural And Revealed Religion.  Vol. II.

  • A Letter of Advice to those Dissenters who conduct the Application to Parliament for Relief from certain Penal Laws, with various Observations relating to similar subjects.  By the Author of the "Free Address to Protestant dissenters as such."


1774

  • An Address to Protestant Dissenters of all Denominations, on the approaching Election of Members of Parliament, with respect to the State of Public Liberty in general, and of American Affairs in particular.

  • Institutions of Natural and Revealed Religion. Vol. III.

  • A Letter to a Layman on the subject of the Rev. Mr. Lindsey's Proposal for a Reformed English Church upon the plan o the late Dr. Samuel Clarke.

  • An Examination of Dr. Reid's Inquiry in to the Human Mind, on the Principles of Common Sense; Dr. Beattie's Essay on the Nature and Immutability of Truth; and Dr. Oswald's Appeal to Common Sense in behalf of Religion.

  • Experiments and Observations on different Branches of Air, and other Branches of Natural Philosophy, connected with the subject.


1775

  • Hartley's Theory of the Human Mind on the Principle of the Association of Ideas, with Essays relating to the subject of it.

  • Philosophical Empiricism, containing Remarks on a Charge of Plagiarism, made by Dr. Higgins; interspersed with Observations relating to different kinds of Air.

  • Considerations for the use of Young Men, and the Parents of Young Men. 

  • Experiments and Observations Vol. II.


1777

  • Disquisitions relating to Matter and Spirit.  To which is added, the History of the Philosophical Doctrine concerning the Soul and the Nature of Matter; with its Influence on Christianity, especially with respect to the Doctrine of the Pre-existence of Christ.

  • The Doctrine of Philosophical Necessity illustrated; being an Appendix to the Disquisitions.

  • A Harmony of the Evangelists in Greek, to which are prefixed, Critical Dissertations in English.

  • A Course of Lectures on Oratory and Criticism.

  • Experiments and Observations Vol. III.


1778

  • Miscellaneous Observations relating to Education, more especially as it respects the Conduct of the Mind.  To which are added, Considerations for the use of Young Men and the Parents of Young Men.

  • A Free Discussion of the Doctrines of Materialism and Philosophical Necessity, in Correspondence between Dr. Price and Dr. Priestley; to which are added, by Dr. Priestley, an Introduction, explaining the Nature of the Controversy, and Letters to several Writers who have animadverted on his Disquisitions relating to Matter and Spirit, or his Treatise on Necessity.


1779

  • Experiments and Observations Vol. IV.

  • The Doctrine of Divine Influence on the Human Mind, considered in a Sermon, preached at the Ordination of the Rev. Messrs. Thomas and John Jevis.  Published at the request of many Persons who have occasionally heard it. 

  • A Letter to the Rev. John Palmer, in Defense of the Illustrations of Philosophical Necessity.


1780

  • A Second Letter to the Rev. Mr. John Palmer.

  • A Letter to Jacob Bryant, Esq., in Defense of Philosophical Necessity.

  • A Harmony of the Evangelists, in English, with Critical Dissertations, an occasional Paraphrase, and Notes for the use of the Unlearned.

  • Two Letters to Dr. Newcome, Bishop of Waterford, late of Ossory, on the Duration of our Savior's Ministry. 

  • Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever. Part I., containing an Examination of the Principal Objections to the Doctrines of Natural Religion, and especially those contained in the Writings of Mr. Hume.

  • A Free Address to those who have petitioned for Repeal of the late Act of a Parliament in favor of the Roman Catholics.  By a Lover of Peace and Truth.

  • Experiments and Observations. Vol. V.


1781

  • A Third Letter to Dr. Newcome, Bishop of Waterford, on the Duration of our Lord's Ministry.


1782

  • An History of the Corruptions of Christianity

  • Additional Letters to a Philosophical Unbelievers.

  • The Proper Constitution of a Christian Church, considered in a Sermon, preached at the New Meeting, in Birmingham, Nov. 3, 1782; to which is prefixed, a Prefatory Discourse, relating to the Present State of those who are called Rational Dissenters.

  • Two Discourses. 1. On Habitual Devotion.  2. On the Duty of not Living to Ourselves.  Both preached to Assemblies of Protestant Dissenting Ministers, and published at their request.


1783

  • A Reply to the Animadversions on the History of the Corruptions of Christianity, in the Monthly Review for June 1783, with additional Observations relating to the Doctrine of the Primitive Church concerning the Person of Christ.

  • Letters to Dr. Horsley, in Answer to his Animadversions on the History of the Corruptions of Christianity; with additional Evidence that the Primitive Christian Church was Unitarian.

  • Remarks on the Article of the Monthly Review for September 1783, in Answer to the Reply to some former Animadversions in that Work.

  • Forms of Prayer, and other Offices, for the Use of Unitarian Societies.


1784

  • Remarks on the Monthly Review of the Letters to Dr. Horsley; in which the Rev. Mr. Samuel Badcock, the writer of that Review, is called upon to defend what he has advanced in it.

  • Letters to Dr. Horsley, Part II,. containing farther Evidence that the Primitive Christian Church was Unitarian.

  • Theological Repository, Vol. IV.


1785

  • The Importance and Extent of Free Inquiry in Matters of Religion.  A Sermon preached before the Congregations of the Old and New Meeting at Birmingham, Nov. 5, 1785.  To which are added, Reflections on the Present state of Free Inquiry in this Country.


1786

  • Letters to Dr. Horsley, Part III., containing an Answer to his Remarks on Letters Part II. To which are added, Strictures on Mr. Howe's Ninth Number of Observations on Books Ancient and Modern.
  • Experiments and Observations, Vol. VI.
  • Theological Repository, Vol. V.
  • An History of Early Opinions concerning Jesus Christ, compiled from Original Writers, proving that the Christian Church was at first Unitarian.

1787

  • Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever, Part II., containing a State of the Evidence of Revealed Religion, with Animadversions on the two last Chapters of the First Volume of Mr. Gibbon's History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.
  • A Letter to the Right Hon. William Pitt, on the Subjects of Toleration and Church Establishments, occasioned by his Speech against the Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts.
  • Defenses of Unitarianism for the year 1786, containing Letters to Dr. Horne, Dean of Canterbury, to the Young Men who are in a course of Education for the Christian Ministry at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge; to Dr. Price and to Mr. Parkhurst, on the Person of Christ.
  • Discourses on Various Subjects, including several on Particular Occasions.
  • Letters to the Jews, Part I., inviting them to an Amicable Discussion of the Evidences of Christianity.
  • Letters to the Jews, Part II., occasioned by Mr. David Levi's Reply to the former Letters
  • Accounts of a Society for the Relief of the Industrious Poor, with some Consideration on the State of the Poor, in general; and a Recommendation of Benefit Societies.

1788

  • An History of the Sufferings of M. Lewis de Marolles, and M. Issac Le Fevre, upon the Revocation of the Edict of Nantz. To which is prefixed a General Account of the Treatment of the Protestants in the Galleys France. Translated from the French, 1712, and now republished.
  • Lectures on History and General Policy. To which is prefixed, an Essay on a course of Liberal education for Civil and Active Life. (Rutt used the 1803 edition and that added lectures on the United States Constitution)
  • A Sermon on the subject of the Slave Trade, delivered to a Society of Protestant Dissenters at the New Meeting in Birmingham, and published at their request.
  • Defenses of Unitarianism for the year 1787, containing Letters to the Rev. Mr. Geddes, to the Rev. Dr. Price, Part II,. And to the Candidates for Orders in the two Universities, Part II., relating to Mr. Howe's Appendix to his fourth volume of Observations on Books, a Letter by an Undergraduate of Oxford, Dr. Croft Bapton's Lectures, and several other Publications.
  • Theological Repository, Vol. VI.

1789

  • The Conduct to be Observed by Dissenters in order to procure the Repeal of the Corporation and Test Acts; recommended in a Sermon preached before the Congregation of the Old and New Meeting at Birmingham, Nov. 5, 1789. Printed at the request of the Committee of the seven Congregations of the Denominations of Protestant Dissenters in Birmingham.

1790

  • A General History of the Christian Church, to the Fall of the Western Empire Experiments and Observations on different Kinds of Air, and other Branches of Natural Philosophy connected with the subject. In three volumes, being the former six abridged and methodized, with many Additions.
  • Familiar Letters addressed to the Inhabitants of Birmingham, in
  • Refutation of several Charges advanced against the Dissenters and Unitarians by the Rev. Mr. Madan; also, Letters to the Rev. Edward Burn, in answer to his on the Infallibility of the Apostolic Testimony concerning the Person of Christ
  • A View of Revealed Religion. A Sermon on the admission of the Rev. W. Field , of Warwick, July 13 1790, with a Charge, by the Rev. Thomas Belsham.
  • Defenses of Unitarianism, for the years 1788 and 1789, containing Letters to Dr. Horsley, Lord Bishop of St. David's, to the Rev. Mr. Bernard, the Rev. Dr. Knowles, and the Rev. Mr. Hawkins.
  • Reflections on Death. A Sermon on occasion on the Death of the Rev. Robert Robinson, of Cambridge, delivered at the New Meeting at Birmingham, June 13, 1790, and published at the request of those who herd it, and of Mr. Robinson's Family.
  • A Philosophical Inquiry concerning Human Liberty. By Anthony Collins, Esq. Republished with a Preface.

1791

  • The proper Objects of Education in the present state of the World, represented in a Discourse delivered on Wednesday, April 27, 1791, at the Meeting-house in the Old Jewry, London, to the Supporters of the New College at Hackney.
  • A Discourse on occasion of the Death of Dr. Price, delivered at Hackney, on Sunday, May 1, 1791. Also a short Sketch of the Life of Dr. Price, with an account of his Publications.
  • Original Letters by the Rev. John Wesley and his Friends, illustrative of his early History, with other curious Papers: to which is prefixed with an Address to the Methodists.
  • Discourse on the Evidence of the Resurrection of Jesus delivered in the Assembly Room at Buxton, on Sunday, Sept. 19, 1790.  To which is prefixed an Address to the Jews.
  • A Political Dialogue on the General Principles of Government.
  • Letters to the Right and Honorable Edmund Burke, occasioned by his Reflections on the Revolution in France, &c.
  • Letters to the Members of the New Jerusalem Church, formed by Baron Swedenborg.
  • The Duty of Forgiveness of Injuries, a Discourse intended to be delivered soon after the Riots in Birmingham.
  • A particular Attention to the Instruction of the Young recommended , in a Discourse delivered at the Gravel-pit Meeting in Hackney, Dec. 4, 1791, on entering on the office of Pastor to the Congregation of Protestant Dissenters assembling in that place.

1792

  • An Appeal to the Public, Part I.  To which are added, Strictures on a Pamphlet entitled, "Thoughts on the late Riots at Birmingham."

  • Letters to a Young Man. Part I, occasioned by Mr. Wakefield's Essay on Public Worship; to which are added, a Reply to Mr. Evanson's Objections to the Observance of the Lord's Day.

  • An Appeal to the Public, on the subject of the Riots in Birmingham, Part. II. To which is added, a Letter from W. Russell, Esq., to the Author.


1793

  • Letters to a Young Man, Part II; occasioned by Mr. Evanson's Treatise on the Dissonance of the four generally-received Evangelists.

  • A Sermon preached at the Gravel-Pit Meeting in Hackney, April 19, 1793, being the day appointed for a General Fast.

  • Letters to the Philosophers and Politicians of France on the subject of Religion.

  • Experiments on the Generation of Air from Water; to which are prefixed, Experiments relating to the Decomposition of Dephlogisticated and Inflammable Air.


1794

  • Heads of Lectures on a Course of Experimental Philosophy, particularly including Chemistry; delivered at the New College in Hackney.

  • The present State of Europe compared with Ancient Prophecies; a Sermon preached at the Gravel-Pit meeting in Hackney, Feb. 28, 1794, being the day appointed for a General Fast; with a Preface, containing the Reasons for the Author's leaving England.

  • Discourses on the Evidence of Revealed Religion.

  • The Use of Christianity, Especially in Difficult Times; a Sermon delivered at the Gravel-Pit Meeting in Hackney, March 30, 1794, being the Author's Farewell Discourse to his Congregation.

  • A Continuation of the Letters to the Philosophers and Politicians of France on the subject of Religion, and of the Letters to a Philosophical Unbeliever, in answer to Mr. Paine's Age of Reason.


1796

  • Experiments and Observations relating to the Analysis of Atmospherical Air; also farther Experiments relating to the Generation of Air from Water.  Red before the American Philosophical Society, Feb. 5th and 19th, 1796, and printed in their Transactions.  To which are added, Considerations on the Doctrine of Phlogiston, and the Decomposition of Water, addressed to Messrs. Berthollet, &c.

  • Discourses relating to the Evidences of Revealed Religion, delivered in the Church of the Universalists at Philadelphia, and published at the request of many of the Hearers.

  • Unitarianism Explained and Defended, in a Discourse delivered in the Church of the Universalists at Philadelphia.


1797

  • Observations on the Increase of Infidelity.  To which are added, Animadversions on the Writings of several Modern Unbelievers, and especially the Ruins of M. Volney. 

  • Letters to M, Volney, occasioned by a Work of his entitled Ruins, and by his Letter to the Author.

  • The Case of Poor Emigrants recommended, in a Discourse delivered at the University Hall in Philadelphia, on Sunday, Feb. 19, 1797.

  • An Address to the Unitarian Congregation at Philadelphia; delivered on Sunday, March 5, 1797.

  • Discourses relating to the Evidences of Reveled Religion, delivered in the Church of the Universalists at Philadelphia. Vol. II.

  • An Outline of the Evidences of Revealed Religion.


1799

  • A Comparison of the Institutions of Moses with those of the Hindoos and other ancient Nations, with Remarks on M. Dupuis's Origin of all Religions; on the allegorizing Talents of M. Boullanger; the Laws and Institutions of Moses methodized: and an Address ot the Jews on the present State of the World, and the Prophecies relating to it.

  • Letters to the Inhabitants of Northumberland and its Neighborhood, on Subjects interesting to the Author and to them.  To which is added, a Letter to a Friend in Paris relating to M. Liancourt's Travels in the North American States.


1800

  • The Doctrine of Phlogiston established, and that of the Composition of Water refuted.


1801

  • An Inquiry into the Knowledge of the ancient Hebrews concerning a Future State.


1802

  • A Letter to an Anti-pædobaptist.

  • A General history of the Christian Church, from the Fall of the Western Empire to the present time.


1803

  • The Doctrine of Phlogiston established, with Observations on the Conversion of Iron into Steel, in a Letter to Mr. Nicholson.

  • Socrates and Jesus Compared.

  • A Letter to the Rev. John Blair Linn, A.M., Pastor of the first Presbyterian Congregation i the City of Philadelphia, in defense of the Pamphlet, entitled Socrates and Jesus compared.

  • On the Originality and the Superior Excellence of the Mosaic Institutions.

  • A General History of the Christian Church.

  • A Second Letter to the Rev. John Blair Linn, D.D. in reply to his Defense of the Doctrines of the Divinity of Christ and Atonement.


Posthumous

  • Notes on all the Books of Scriptures, for the use of the Pulpit and Private Families.

  • The Doctrines of Heathen Philosophy compared with those of Revelation.

  • Index to the Bible, in which the various Subjects which occur in the scriptures are alphabetically arranged; with accurate References to all the Books of the Old and New Testaments. Designed to facilitate the Study of these invaluable Records.

  • Four Discourses, intended to have been delivered at Philadelphia.  the Duty of Mutual Exhortations.  Faith and Patience.  The Change which took place in the Character of the Apostles after the Resurrection of Jesus Christ.  Published by desire of the Author. 

  • Letters to the Bishop upon the Subject of the Controversy with Dr. Horsley. 1790.

  • Memoirs of Dr. Joseph Priestley to the Year 1795, written by himself; with a Continuation to the Time of his Decease, by his son Joseph Priestley; and Observations on his Writings, by Thomas Cooper, President Judge of the fourth District of Pennsylvania; and the Rev. William Christie.

 
     
 
Last modified: December 3, 2009 * Copyright © 2009 Andrew Burd-Harris